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  CO2 Laser Optics & Consumable Products / Prisms & Rhombs
Prisms & Rhombs
      RGQ and Order
Prisms & Rhombs

It’s often necessary to alter or manipulate the source’s polarization. For example, a reflective phase retarder converts linear to circular polarization and improves the laser cutting quality. (For reflective phase retarders, please see Phase Retarders.) However, most polarization altering devices -- the reflective phase retarder and waveplates -- are very wavelength sensitive and offer only narrowband, or single wavelength operation.

The Fresnel prisms and rhombs described on this page utilize the principle that when light undergoes total internal reflection, there is a relative phase change between the s and p polarization components. This effect is only weakly dependent on wavelength (Figure 1). Thus, these components are ideal for those working at either multiple distinct wavelengths or with broadband sources in the 8 to 12 µm region.

By manipulating the rhomb’s geometry, devices which produce quarter-wave, half-wave, or virtually any required retardation can be constructed. Please contact a II-VI sales representative with your design requirements.

Quarter-Wave Prism: converts linear into circular polarization, and turns the beam path Quarter-Wave Rhomb: produces an output beam which is parallel, but displaced from, the input Half-Wave Rhomb: changes the polarization's orientation for a linearly polarized input. The output polarization orientation is varied by rotating the rhomb around the optical axis. The output beam is parallel to, but displaced from, the input beam.
Quarter-Wave Prism
converts linear into circular polarization, and turns the beam path
Quarter-Wave Rhomb
produces an output beam which is parallel, but displaced from, the input
Half-Wave Rhomb
changes the polarization's orientation for a linearly polarized input. The output polarization orientation is varied by rotating the rhomb around the optical axis. The output beam is parallel to, but displaced from, the input beam.

Phase Shift vs. Wavelength: for common retardation devices
Phase Shift vs. Wavelength: for common retardation devices
   
 
           
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